Between a pair of divorcees in California, one person often holds primary custody. The other parent will then pay child support. This helps make up the financial difference between a one and two-parent household. It can provide the supporting spouse with an extra financial cushion. But what do you do if your spouse refuses to pay?

In 1984, the Child Support Enforcement Act was in effect. This act helps you to collect any court-ordered money from a spouse that refuses to pay. The district attorney often handles payment collection matters. They serve the spouse papers and set up a meeting to determine payment arrangements. If a parent refuses to attend these meetings, then they can sometimes face jail time.

But putting a parent in jail can remove them from their source of income. This, unfortunately, defeats the purpose. You cannot collect support payments from an unemployed spouse. In this situation, the court may impose other consequences. They may include any of the following, or a combination:

  • Seizing property
  • Garnishing wages
  • Suspending occupational or business licenses
  • Revoking driver’s licenses

This will not change unless the parent begins making their child support payments. If they owe over $2,500, then the court can even refuse to issue the individual a passport. This keeps them from fleeing the country to avoid payments.

Child support payments can be a difficult topic to tackle. If you want to read about how courts determine these payments, visit our web page. You can also learn more about how to enforce these payments, which is a crucial part.