When you and your California spouse part ways, you may decide to pursue spousal support if you were the lower-earning party in your relationship. The same holds true if you put your career or schooling on hold for the sake of your husband or wife. When deciding whether you should receive spousal support, California refers to a specific set of factors.

Per the Judicial Branch of California, some of the factors California considers when it comes to awarding you spousal support are as follows.

The length of your marriage

Typically, your chances of securing spousal support improve when your marriage was a lengthy one. If you do receive spousal support in your divorce, you may wind up receiving it for about half the length of time your marriage lasted. However, there is no hard, fast rule dictating as much. Sometimes, when marriages last 10 years or longer, judges may award spousal support without giving a specific end date for the support term.

Your level of employability

Your chances of receiving spousal support may also improve if you are older, lack marketable skills or have spent quite some time out of the workforce. Your likelihood of securing gainful employment on your own is often a key consideration in spousal support cases. If it may take you time to become employable again, the judge in your case may consider this when deciding whether to award support and for how long.

While these are among the factors that help determine whether you receive spousal support in California, other relevant areas may also undergo review.