Divorce can be a tough time for you and your ex-spouse, but one person who may be struggling quietly without your knowledge could be your child.

Helping him or her manage stress during this time can mean a better school life and improved mental health.

Schedule some quiet time

According to the American Psychological Association, some children may thrive while staying busy but many others need extra time alone during stressful periods of their life. Increased irritability and temper tantrums after you discuss divorce can be one sign of a problem.

Setting some time aside for rest can allow him or her to relax and process these intense emotions. Finding a good balance between daily activities and downtime can be helpful for you both.

Encourage good habits

Eating a balanced diet and sleeping a full nine or more hours a night are two simple ways to stay mentally healthy. In addition, going outside and spending time playing with friends can help take children’s minds off of any family issues.

Encouraging your children to keep these habits can help them when life seems hectic and overwhelming.

Write out feelings

Sometimes emotions can require a creative outlet. Writing not only about negative feelings, but also positive thoughts, can reduce stress and anxiety. Advising your child to keep a journal or notebook of what he or she is feeling can be one way to work through these confusing emotions.

Divorce is a stressful time for anyone, but children can be especially prone to worry. Some children may be unable to express the deeper emotions of fear or helplessness they feel all throughout this time, but giving them outlets can help.